Seasonal Magic with Children: Creating a seasonal table.

In our little patch of Suffolk over the last few days, it really feels like spring has well and truly landed. The sky is at its bluest, and it feels glorious sit and bask in the first warmth after winter. More likely than not, its not going to last too long before we at least get some spring showers, so we are making the most of it all and truly immersing ourselves in (a slightly early) beginning of spring.

Sometimes, that might be the simple act of hanging washing outside to dry. Or changing up our menu a little for fresher food. Every season we pull out new books, and put old ones away. And in spring I love getting stuck into the house, and giving it a good old traditional spring clean.

But the thing that makes it truly feel like spring in our house (or any other season for that matter), is bringing the outside in. We like to decorate with seasonal touches, and one of the easiest and most child-friendly ways of doing so is creating a seasonal table.

We create seasonal tables to strengthen our connection to nature, to create a deeper understanding of what’s going on outside our front door and to mark the passing of time and the changes that happen what that. Bringing bits of nature into our home causes us to really notice it and appreciate the small shifts within the season, and taking out the certain toys and books each time brings a kind of reverence that otherwise I feel we would only find once a year in pulling out the Christmas decorations.

And that’s not to say your seasonal table even has to exist on a table. I’ve made displays, yes, on top of Eilish’s toy shelves and the dinner table, but also on the kitchen island, a mantelpiece or window sills. Ideally they are accessible to children, but I think that just having any kind of seasonal display that a child can see sitting from their highchair or in a corner of a room honours that connection to the happenings outside.

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I love that our table morphs and changes with the season too, not just between each one. Nature collections are curated by little hands to be found and treasured, even with one so small they still are carefully carried home in the front pocket of our backpack. The flowers that are in bloom change and we add a new variety, or a new book becomes a favourite and we place that there instead.

Caring for the seasonal table can also be a great practical life activity for children, whether that’s watering any live plants or changing the water in any arranged flowers, taking away and adding new items or just giving it a little dust once a week. It can be as big or as simple as you like, and can reflect your family values and what you find interesting or special to you all about the time of year.

There are so many ways to create your displays, and so many to find and be inspired by, but here I’ve included just a few ideas.

The simplest but by no means any less special, a small nature collection on your dining table, one that can be added to, curated and loved by children.

The simplest but by no means any less special, a small nature collection on your dining table, one that can be added to, curated and loved by children.

Using a celebration ring is lovely, and we adore using ours all year round. I love that we can take out the same decorations each year to decorate. We also add candles to ours depending on the season, or some seasonal finds, fairies, or fresh flowers, if we had only the figures it would soon add up so I also like finding our own treasures to add to it.

Using a celebration ring is lovely, and we adore using ours all year round. I love that we can take out the same decorations each year to decorate. We also add candles to ours depending on the season, or some seasonal finds, fairies, or fresh flowers, if we had only the figures it would soon add up so I also like finding our own treasures to add to it.

We created this leaf garland over autumn, and made small vases from empty spice jars. Sometimes I take out our polaroid camera for nature walks, and I love the idea of getting Eilish her own little one to record things for herself when she’s a little older.

We created this leaf garland over autumn, and made small vases from empty spice jars. Sometimes I take out our polaroid camera for nature walks, and I love the idea of getting Eilish her own little one to record things for herself when she’s a little older.

On our book shelves we have a plant in bloom for the month, and a few seasonal books. I think over spring we may plant some grass or cress in a pot to play with, or maybe a few bulbs to grow together.

On our book shelves we have a plant in bloom for the month, and a few seasonal books. I think over spring we may plant some grass or cress in a pot to play with, or maybe a few bulbs to grow together.

We used a yellow playsilk and a few wooden animals to create an autumnal scene that Eilish loved to play with, as well as gave a nod to the season.

We used a yellow playsilk and a few wooden animals to create an autumnal scene that Eilish loved to play with, as well as gave a nod to the season.

A few natural treasures on a side in the living room; some found conkers, pine cones, a bunch of flowers and a much loved feather that was carried the whole way home.

A few natural treasures on a side in the living room; some found conkers, pine cones, a bunch of flowers and a much loved feather that was carried the whole way home.

What do you have on your seasonal tables at home? And please let me know if you’re inspired in anyway by any of our displays, I’d love to know.

The Family Collective Guide to Spring is released tomorrow, 27th February, a guide that I’ve written to share our love of celebrating each and every season. In it I hope to help you introduce your children to the wonders of spring, to take the work out of planning carefully curated seasonal activities and to give you the tools to create a little bit of everyday magic for your family over the next few months. You can read more about it here, and I look forward to seeing some of you enjoying your guides with your families.